What plant is on your mind?

A dedicated place where visitors from all over the world can hold conversations about plants, post photos of their collections, ask care questions, and share advice.

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What plant is on your mind?

A dedicated place where visitors from all over the world can hold conversations about plants, post photos of their collections, ask care questions, and share advice.

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  • Prayer plant
    Sorry my photo is on its side
      • 1
      PlntNrd How much water are you giving it and how humid is the environment? When the leaves are droopy like that it can be from under or overwatering. And the dusty/dusky appearance actually happens when calathea aren’t getting enough humidity and the leaves are suffering. This is the first thing that happens, then the leaves start to get brown and crispy and, eventually, die off. I would look at the amount and how often you’re watering (also make sure there’s drainage) and provide more humidity.
      • 1
      Pei It actually looks fine to me cuz it has new growth. But it's very dusty - I would suggest to wipe down the leaves at least once a week!
      • 1
      Celia Skelton That is what I thought but the soil is moist from the top down
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  • What is this??
    Anyone know what kind of plant this is? It was only labeled by as “houseplant.”

    thank you!!
  • Zebra Plant Propagation Tips
    Hey all! I've had this zebra plant for a few years and over the past six months or so it's been growing several "pups." However, I'm struggling to figure out whether it's time to try to remove the pups and grow them as separate plants. The pups aren't growing arial roots or anything like that, they just keep getting bigger and bigger. Any tips are much appreciated!
      • 1
      PlntNrd You need to wait until these are big enough to have their own root system and make sure you get some of those roots when you cut them off. If they don’t have any roots attached, there’s a good chance they won’t survive.
  • someone help
    im not a huge succulent person, so i have no idea what’s wrong with it. what am i doing wrong?
      • 1
      PlntNrd Its over watered. You can see that it’s overwatered by looking at the lower leaves. That bottom leaf in the forefront is yellow/almost translucent. That is from too much water. It also looks like, rather than being etiolated, it has lost leaves making it appear as there is lots of space on the stem between leaves. The top looks like it has some rot issues from overwatering too.
      • 1
      Pei looks like it's not getting enough sun!
      • 1
      Erin I'd move to bright direct light (if it's not in a spot that receives that light already), and remove the rocks from the top. Those rocks can help potting mix hold in moisture - which is something a succulent definitely doesn't need. It likes it dry!
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  • New leafling
    can anyone tell me how to repot this gigantic monstera without harming it? It is truly amazing but has way outgrown the nursery pot that I think it has been living in for years - the previous owner sold him to me because she no longer had space for him...
      • 1
      Erin Whoa it is a beauty!

      You can find the sill's repotting steps here- https://www.thesill.com/blogs/care-miscellaneous/plant-care-repotting

      Now is a great time to repot since it's the start of the growing season. I'd go with a planter that's two or three inches wider in diameter than it's current grow pot.
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      Molly Jagoda This is it
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  • View from the top
  • Book recommendations?
    Anyone have any reading recs on the history of houseplants? I was reading an article earlier that said the ZZ Plant wasn't grown commercially until until 1996 (!!!) and they cited this book. 
  • Monstera please help!
    Hi! I need help! I am usually dubbed the green thumb and. An usually keep a plant alive and thriving, but this monstera is not happy. I repotted with a mix of perlite, sill potting soil, and sill cactus soil. Is it not draining well? My pot has a large hole at the bottom but the bottoms are turning black? My house has a water softener? Could it be the salts? Should I use distilled water? Unsure ): 
      • 1
      Erin Agree with Jenna below- if you can repot it into fresh dry soil, that might be worthwhile! If you're able to share a photo of the entire plant that would be helpful too. I'd also say you might not need to create your own potting mix. Perlite helps hold in moisture so it might have been doing a disservice to your plant - where your soil felt dry on top so you watered, but essentially there was already moisture waiting to be needed under the surface. I'd just stick with general sill potting soil.
      • 1
      Sophia Campos some of the plant does not have that, but I want to make sure I dont kill the rest of it. is the soil holding too much water? I ordered a soil sleuth to check. I just don't want it dying
      • 1
      Pei oh no! It has rotted unfortunately and beyond savable :( I don't think it has anything to do with monstera as they are usually not that sensitive.
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  • Monstera and flies
    Recently I received a 6” monstera from sill as a gift and while watering it today I noticed apx 5-10 tiny flies fly from the soil. Anyone know what this means or what to do?
      • 1
      Pei Does that pot has drainage? Fugus gnats are annoying to deal with, but it's a good indicator that the soil has been consistently staying too moist. So I'd recommend to let the soil dry out completely – at least 3" deep – and make sure you only water when the soil is dry to touch (same depth!). And yes, Monsteras like bright light even half day full sun would work too. They need the energy (sun) to put the splits and holes btw!!
      • 3
      Erin Fungus gnats love moisture! I'd recommend letting the soil try out completely before watering again. You can help it try out quicker if you put it in a spot where it receives bright indirect light, which monsteras love anyway. If you want to really deter them, I'd get some diatomaceous earth from amazon prime or your local hardware store and sprinkle a generous amount in the soil too.
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      Emily This is my monstera
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  • what is this plant?
    ive had this plant for a while and i don’t know what it is called
      • 1
      Pei Yup my vote is a Gasteria succulent too. It's very similar to Aloes and you want to give it 5-6 hours direct light and water twice a month. The leaves would look wrinkly, like your hands in the water for too long, when it's thirsty!
      • 1
      Erin Looks like a Gasteria succulent, but not positive which variety! Very similar to aloes and haworthia. Loves bright direct light and not a lot of water.
  • My plant is turning pink!
    Hi fam! So my plant was incredibly healthy and growing, but recently the stem has turned pink (and at a rapid pace). I tried re-potting it thinking that perhaps the roots were wet and molding but there hasn't seemed to be a change yet. Any advice on how to keep my friend alive?
    Thank you!
      • 1
      PlntNrd How often are you watering it and how much light is it getting?When succulents turn colors, like red or pink, it’s a response to stress. Stress can be from a lot of, or too little, light, very little water, or change in environment. I don’t think yours has to do with too much light, it’s actually looks very etiolated, which means it’s not getting enough light. So the next thing to look at is are you underwatering it (which is fine to do) or had there been a drastic change is it’s environment. I stress my succulents with too much light and lack of water to get specific colors, so it’s not necessarily bad or harmful. The one thing I would to is get more light for it somehow. It should have 6-8hrs of fulls in a day. With most succulents, you should not be able to see the stem and, for sure, if you can touch the stem with your finger, it’s too etiolated. The leaves should be stacked on top of each other tightly. There are a few kinds that do have a growth pattern that is long and stretches, but there isn’t that much space between the leaves.
      • 1
      Pei It looks healthy to me! How much sun does it get by the way? Plants would change its color if it's getting too much/too little light. Another thing would be watering issue, but if you already examine the roots and all look fine, i think it's the sun :)
      • 1
      Erin It looks happy and healthy to me! If it was root rot, the stem would be mushy, but it looks pretty stable in the photo. The pink color could be attributed to new growth or more light - both good things :)
  • Concerning Stems
    This is showing up on a few of the stems on my ZZ Plant. Is this root rot, or from pests?? 
    Thanks!! 
      • 1
      Pei [291426,jenna] is a ZZ expert. Maybe she can help!
      • 1
      Caitlyn Jones [288486,PlntNrd] the areas were not quite mushy, but definitely a weaker consistency than the rest of the stems. I typically give this plant a splash of water (probably 1/4 cup or less, but I haven’t been measuring) once every other week. I am new-ish to being a plant owner, so I haven’t experienced root rot yet or know exactly what it looks like. I unpotted and cleaned off the roots to check them out. I didn’t see any obvious signs of rotting (to my naive eyes, let me know if I’m missing something in the picture). So I separated the 3 questionable stems and repotted the rest of the plant with clean soil. I put the questionable ones in a separate small pot to see if they can recover. I had no idea about the water getting on the stems/leaves though! Than you for that tip!
      X
      • 1
      PlntNrd Are those areas soft and/or mushy? Is yes, then it is rot. That’s what it look like from the pic. That pot doesn’t have drainage and ZZ plants do not need much water, so I would suspect that it may be overwatered. How much and how often have you been watering it? I have the same plant in the same pot and I only water a small amount twice a month. Every environment and home is different, so yours may need more or less, but if you’re watering a large amount and very often you may want to change that. At this point, since there are already signs of rot, you might want to unpot, check to see if the rhizomes are rotted, remove affected stems/areas and repot in fresh, clean, dry soil. I also see water droplets on the stems in the pic, when watering you may want to just wet the soil and not the plant itself. Getting water on the stems or leaves can cause issues with rot, mold, etc and ZZ plants are considered to be succulents and should be treated as such. Good luck.
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  • Finally got the husband to hang these..
    I bought 3 of these some time last year and they’ve been sitting in a box. I finally got my husband to hang them up for me and then I had to figure out what to put in them. I’m so happy with how they turned out! I really love the way they look above the couch with my pics and I love the way the plants look in them. Now I have to decide where to put the third one, but I’m definitely very pleased with the look of these two. 
      • 1
      Erin Digging the pops of green against the dark wall!
      • 1
      Pei 😍😍😍 they look awesome! Can’t wait to see when the philo starts vining.

      Is that a spider plants on the left? I personally also really like asparagus fern. They vine and so elegant!
  • Soil Recommendations for Repotting Gardenia
    Pretty straightforward. Just got a small gardenia and I think it needs to be repotted soon - lots of roots growing out of bottom of container.

    I've read they are very finicky and seen lots of suggestions on soil mixtures and additives - if nothing else it seems they enjoy acidic soil with a pH around 5.

    _Any off the shelf suggestions for indoor gardenias?
    _Any suggestions for magic mixes to make my own? Rather not do this but I will if it's best.

    BONUS
    _Any other specific suggestions on fertilizers or soil conditioners or who knows what that gardenias love?
  • All my plants seem to be sick
    All my plants seem to be sick. The ends are turning brown or certain leaves are discolored and sagging :( how can I save them and help them thrive?
      • 4
      PlntNrd I would look in to your watering techniques. That’s the number one way that most plants die or suffer at the hands of an owner. If all of your plants seem to be affected by something and aren’t thriving and flourishing, then there must be something going on. Look at how much and how often you’re watering, whether they have drainage, how much light they are exposed to, and check for pests.
      • 2
      Pei Hi Megan, the Rosso peperomia in the photo looks like it's not getting enough light. You can tell because most of the new growths (on top) are so much smaller!

      But your other plants, how much sun and water do they get? are they all in the same spots??
    • 2 more comments