What plant is on your mind?

A dedicated place where visitors from all over the world can hold conversations about plants, post photos of their collections, ask care questions, and share advice.

New Post
 

Featured Topics

What plant is on your mind?

A dedicated place where visitors from all over the world can hold conversations about plants, post photos of their collections, ask care questions, and share advice.

New Post

Latest Greenery

  • Maranta help
    I noticed recently my maranta had mealy bugs so I treated it with hydrogen peroxide but when I was looking at the stems I saw little nubs on the stems..is that normal or from the mealy bugs?? Thanks!
  • Growth spurt
    This echevaria has had this huge growth spurt in the last week or two. Does it need to be repotted?
      • 1
      NRD The “growth spurt” looks like etiolation. It’s reaching for more light. You can see the top is lighter and you can see the stem showing and space between the leaves. These require full sun for 6 or more hours a day. Maybe try putting it in a brighter spot with more direct sun.
      • 2
      Pei OMG 😍😍😍 [289322,Linda]
      • 1
      Erin Marino Oh whoa! That is one happy Echeveria! I'd let it be for now, then repot it to a planter about one to two inches wider in diameter come spring.
    • 3 more comments
  • Hopeless holly?
    My holly plant is losing leaves.  Thoughts on what is causing this?  They are turning brown and falling off 
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Could be an indication of insufficient lighting? If a plant isn’t getting enough sun then that means not enough energy to sustain all its leaves.. which is why they start to drop them! Or if your leaves look more “scorched” before they fall it could be a sign of too much direct sunlight!
  • Calathea Pinstripe Care
    Hello! New plant owner and newbie. So, I ordered a Calathea Pinstripe, which I realize now was probably not the best choice for a beginner. Ha! Anyway, probably a silly question, but when it arrives, do I leave it in the pot it comes in and then set that directly into a planter? Or, do I need to cut it out and plant it? Recommendations for soil, etc? Also, I live in a drier climate and I know they like humidity. Will misting it be enough? Any tips for this beginner would be much appreciated!!
      • 1
      Andrea I just got it yesterday and I have a leaf curling. Anything to be worried about? I’ve been trying to baby it since it arrived!!
      X
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Andrea! I’m a Calathea owner myself and it’s definitely a plant that needs more attention. It’s always good to leave your plant in the nursery pot for a few days so it can acclimate to its environment first to prevent shock once transplanting to its permanent home. Do not cut your plant! It should already be rooted so when you repot you’ll only be breaking up the “root ball”. Usually a soil that has good drainage but also water retention as Calatheas like to stay moist! A soil mix with both perlite and peat moss will work best! As far as humidity goes, I tend to put humidity loving plants in my bathroom and mist them several times a day. Misting once a day won’t do much, so if humidity is an issue investing in a humidifier and grouping plants with similar requirements will work! Hope this helps :)
    • 2 more comments
  • pilea peperomioides leaves turning brown and falling off
    I got a mini pilea peperomioides from the UWS Sill a few weeks ago and it hasn't been doing well. I initially had it near a north facing window but moved it to an unobstructed west facing window after reading that north facing windows provide lowest light levels. I may have over watered in that I didn't let the soil really dry out between waterings.

    Leaves have been going brown and falling off. Is this due to over watering? If so, how can I revive my mini pilea peperomioides? :(

    Any thoughts and comments would be incredibly helpful! thank you!
      • 2
      Paris Lalicata Hi Selena! The colors of the leaves can be an indication of overwatering. Are any other parts of the plant soft and mushy to the touch? After removing all dead and brown leaves it would be a good idea to investigate the roots and see if root rot has set in. If this isn't the case I've seen leaves brown like this due to cold damage. If you leave a window open for too long cold drafts can do bad damage to your plants.. hope this helps!
  • Wilting Monstera :(
    I got this Monstera from the UWS Sill location a few weeks ago. I initially had it in my room near a north facing window, but then I read that north facing windows provide the lowest light. I moved in right next to my unobstructed west facing living window after about a week or so. I may have overwatered it at some point, I think I was watering the recommended 1x/week but I might not have waited until the soil was dry enough. I've since been really cautious about watering.

    Several leaves are wilting a lot and one small leaf is very yellow. I noticed another larger leaf (not shown well in this photo) is getting a yellow around one edge. I'm confused because the information card the Sill gave me about Monstera plants said that wilting is a sign of under watering while yellow leaves are a sign of over watering - but I have leaves that are in both categories so I'm not sure what's going on.

    I've also just moved my plant again yesterday about 2 feet away from the unobstructed west facing window on top of this mantle. One leaf was getting a little brown and "crispy" looking at its edge and I wasn't sure if this was due to too much light (though it's winter so I'm not sure if the light is too much at this time of year). Also, I noticed that one of the stems feels "loose" near the soil, like it's not anchored properly, and all the leaves coming off that stem are super wilting. But that stem was "loose" like that at the soil when I got it from the Sill. Unfortunately, I can only attach one photo (don't know why it's sideways)

    Any thoughts and comments would be much appreciated! Really hoping I can improve this plant's situation!
      • 3
      Eliza Blank Selena, I recommend you cut out the yellow leaves and situate the Monstera in direct light (so long as it's warm... ie not touching a cold or drafty window) and really let it dry out. It should make a full recovery! You can also clip out that one "loose" stem. The plant will put all its energy into the healthy leaves and new leaves soon too!
  • Pothos problems
    First off, I am a new plant owner! I studied basic agronomy for years in high school, so I'm not entirely starting from zero knowledge... I understand the basics and get the gist when it comes to terminology, soil, etc. However, I have never had houseplants. I got all of these plants about a week ago and have watered most of them once. None have been repotted yet, and all are doing fine except my Pothos suddenly has yellow leaves at the bottom. 
    Normally, I keep my Pothos in the bathroom. 2 of 6 of my vanity bulbs are 5000 lumens/daylight LED bulbs, so it's pretty bright, but I don't keep those lights on while at work or sleeping. The past couple of days, I have been putting all of them in this windowsill which receives indirect light. However, because I have dogs, I would prefer to grow the Pothos in my bathroom so that I don't have to keep them locked out of the bedroom or forget to and end up with sick dogs.
    So first question, did I overwater, is my Pothos not getting enough light, is it just adjusting, etc? Second question, is this window enough light for my other plants? Third, do I need to repot any of these babies yet? Thanks so much!
      • 1
      Al Hi Paige,

      I would prune the plant and get rid of anything yellow and dried up. Make sure to check that at least 2in of your soil is dry before you water again. Also check your window sill- sometimes in the winter placing a plant by a window is actually cold- touch your windows and the sill you have it on and make sure its warm to touch. Typically you should get plants out of their nursery pots as soon as possible as plastic is not so porous and the roots will need to breathe. Best to repot them in terracotta when they are next due to be watered (easier to repot with drier soil).
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Hi Paige! Sorry to hear about your pothos. Yellow leaves can be a sign of overwatering. Did you check the soil before you watered to make sure it needed it? Pothos like to dry out in between waterings (not bone dry though). If you pick off all the dead or yellowed plant material it'll be a good way to keep monitoring your plants health from here on. What kind of window are you placing the plants? Good to know to see how many hours of light you're getting and the intensity of it. Lastly, you don't need to repot your plants unless they become pot bound or need to freshen up the soi which is usually only once or twice a year! Hope this helps!
      • 1
      Paige Whitis Here is another photo!
      X
  • Help!
    I am terrible with plants, but trying to have more throughout my house. I bought a handful of low light plants since I get a lot of sunlight in my house, but not directly through the windows. All of the plants seem to be doing ok, except this one. I have only had it for a couple of weeks. Any ideas to save it?
      • 1
      Paris Lalicata Erin! That looks like a very thirsty Marble Queen, have you tried watering it? If it's getting a lot of sunlight you might have to water it more often than you think. A good way to monitor your soil moisture is with a soil probe if you have a hard time keeping track! If you let your plant wilt too much from being under watered it can get to a permanent wilting point that it can't be saved from. Hope this helps!
  • Monstera Leaf Progress?
    I have had my monstera for about 2 years now, and I bought her as a tiny little one with just a few leaves.  None of the leaves have split yet, but I have noticed some funky holes in one of the leaves.  Is this a problematic leaf, or is this what it starts to look like before the splitting happens?
      • 2
      Pei [289062,Tessa] when was the last time you repot it and how much sun does it get? I read that those famous holes and splittings actually come as they age.
  • Philodendron's Leaves Are Droopy (Purchased Only Last Month!)
    I only purchased this a month ago. I repotted, watered weekly, and everything. I don't know what's wrong!! Help?!
      • 1
      dekadaye maybe too much water? try every other week
      • 1
      Pei It looks pretty happy to me. Why did you think it's not happy? [288970,CrisAnne Fernandez]
  • black spots on new Pothos
    I received this plant about a week ago. I let it acclimate and just repotted it yesterday. Today I noticed black spots on some of the leaves - these leaves feel thin and flimsy. Help :(
      • 1
      Pei It looks like cold damage to me . I suggest to pinch it off :)
  • Blooming pencil cactus
    Never seen this before! Also recently learned a couple other things about this plant: Despite the name it's actually a euphorbia, a succulent, and not a cactus. If it starts off trailing (like mine) it will stay that way, versus growing into a tall plant. The clear sap that pencils produce (the little bubbles on the stems) is toxic and can give you a bad rash.
      • 2
      Beth The sap can also cause anaphylactic shock and more sunlight reddens the cactus making it look orange. I haven’t bought one of these myself, but dang those flowers are really cute!
  • Patterned Aloe (Agave!)
    Look at these white lines, painted by mother nature! Growing at a cactus farm in Morocco, but I forget her name. Anyone know?
  • Plant Fact of the Week - January 8th, 2019
    It's always a good day for science when we discover something that makes us reevaluate our role in the universe.  Something that reminds us that there is a larger world out there than our cities and towns. Something like based on new fossil evidence from the Middle East, seed-bearing plants have evolved much earlier than previously thought!  Previously, we had thought that dinosaurs roamed the earth before seed-bearing plants, but with this new find, it appears to be the other way around. The find also mounts more evidence to the theory that the tropics are a hotbed of evolution, even though the climate is stable.  This leaves much to think about. If seed-bearing plants existed before dinosaurs, it would make sense that the seeds were a source of food for many- even today, seeds and nuts count for some of the highest caloric intake a herbivore can get. This high energy diet would support the large sizes that dinosaurs became during their reign on earth.  Bear in mind that seed-bearing does not necessarily mean flower-producing! Flowering plants still came after dinosaurs were around. The seed-bearing plants that evolved with/alongside dinosaurs are the Gymnosperms, more commonly known as conifers, cycads, ginkgo, and the like.
    More info here from Science
  • Show me Your Favorite Planters & Pots!
    I like having a unique collection of pots. What's your favorite?