What plant is on your mind?

A dedicated place where visitors from all over the world can hold conversations about plants, post photos of their collections, ask care questions, and share advice.

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What plant is on your mind?

A dedicated place where visitors from all over the world can hold conversations about plants, post photos of their collections, ask care questions, and share advice.

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  • Bird of paradise root rot?
    Hello! I’ve had my bird of paradise plant for about 2 years, but the past few weeks it’s been looking pretty sick. I water it every other week with tap water (when the soil is dry ~2 inches down). I’ve already had to cut the bottom 2 leaves off since the leaves have been curling, then turning brown, then die. And now it’s spreading to the next leaf and I’m worried the plant is dying! I did a little reading and am wondering if it’s root rot, and whether I should replant or do something else? I really love this plant so any suggestions are much appreciated! 
      • 1
      Claire Casaregola @pei I don’t measure how much water I give it, but if I had to estimate maybe 2-3 cups. I wait to see how fast the water is absorbed- once it starts absorbing slowing I stop adding water. The lighting in my apartment isn’t great :/ it’s indirect sunlight all day, but strongest in the morning. I haven’t reported in about 8 months later
      • 1
      Pei [293996,Claire Casaregola] how much water do you give each time? Also what kind of light does it get? When was the last time your refresh the soil?
  • Haworthia Zebra root rot
    I purchased this little guy about a few months ago from a Home Depot. All went well for the first few weeks but he began losing his leaves more often than I assume to be normal-- only to find root rot. I removed as much as I could but there has been no luck growing roots. Any help is welcome!
      • 1
      PlntNrd You can actually save some succulents after they get root rot. It depends on how extensive the rot is and how fast you catch it. You’ve already done the most important thing, which is removing as much rot as you can. The problem with Haworthia is that they do not root from leaves and need their stems to form new roots. If you had to cut out too much of the base, it might not be able to reroot. It looks like there might even be some rot left in the base (but it’s hard to say from a pic), which means the rot could be too extensive to save the Haworthia. What I would do is, basically, what you’re already doing. You’ve cut out as much rot as possible, now plant that little guy in a dry coarse mix and let it be. Keep it out of direct sunlight, but in good bright light. Then just leave it for awhile. There’s no exact timeline for how long it can take to reroot, it could be weeks, it could be months. No need to water, since there aren’t any roots anyway. If it’s not growing roots and started to look very very dry in a few weeks, you can mist a little bit every once in a while, you can even cover it with plastic to keep the humidity in. For now, just be patient and keep doing what you’re doing.
      • 1
      Pei oh no! Once a succulent has root rot, it's beyond savable. RIP little guy :( Succulents have very shallow roots so it's very easy to overwater them.

      How much sun did it get? did you water it frequently?
  • Pilea stems turning red??
    Hi! Is this normal? I don’t think I over water her as I use my moisture meter to check if the soil is completely dry.
      • 2
      Pei it's normal, [293343,Madison] ! you plant do seem a bit thirsty to me though :)
      • 2
      PlntNrd Newer Pilea stems will sometimes be reddish. This is very normal and eventually, with age, they will usually turn the green color of the others.
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  • Sad BNF
    My BNF has been pretty sad since I received it. I tried to nourish it to health, but clearly failed. The rest of my plants I've been able to revive, but not this one. And it has tons of soil gnats. Is there any hope of bringing it back to life? I'd love to save it if possible.
      • 2
      Jessica O Darn. Thanks guys. I've tossed it. I was just surprised that it might be over watered since my other plants are doing so well. I'll definitely use a pot with drainage on my next try.
      • 1
      Pei agreed with [288486,PlntNrd]! there's not much you can do at this point :( RIP!!

      Ferns usually like to stay moist, it's difficult to revive them once it's completely dry out like that....
      • 2
      PlntNrd Eeesh, I hate to say this, but I’m not sure there is much you can do at this point. That looks like it was severely overwatered and has rotted and died. It looks like there’s mold on the soil too. I think you might just have to try again with a new birds nest fern, just be very careful about watering, especially if you get it from The Sill (and it looks like you did). They don’t have drainage holes in most of their pots, which makes it easy to overwater. And if you ever see mold on your soil, pull that plant up, clean off all the roots well, check for rot, throw that soil away, thoroughly clean the pot, and replace with fresh clean soil. That might just be a good thing to do if you have a major infestation of any pest too. Then evaluate your watering schedule and technique, because if you have mold on the soil or plant, you’re watering too much. I think everyone kind of goes through this when they are new to plants. I certainly did. I almost killed an African violet from overwatering and it took me almost a year to recover it to the point where it actually bloomed again, but you learn through experience.
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  • Monstera leaf with brown patch
      • 1
      Pei it looks like fungal infection to me. I would snip that leaf tbh. Alternatively you could also take the whole plant out and carefully examine the roots to make sure there is no rotting.

      I think the most important thing though is to move it to the window sill. Mostera needs bright light environment!
      • 1
      PlntNrd Did it not have these brown areas when you bought it? They developed in a short time in your home? How dry is it in your home/the room this is in? One thing it could be, but that’s awfully extensive damage for this, so I’m not sure, is low humidity. Monsteras like high levels of humidity and do develop brown dry patches on their leaves when the levels are too low. It’s possible that there was high humidity where it was and now it’s very low and the leaves are reacting to that. Another thing that causes issues like this is inconsistent watering. Underwatering and then overwatering can cause cells to rupture and that causes necrotic areas like this. How big is the pot, how much are you watering (actual amount, not how often), and is there drainage in the pot. A third thing to think about is some type of pest. There are pests that suck the fluids/nutrients from leaves and leave deflated patches like this. You might have to do a little investigating to figure out what’s going on, but I would start by looking at those things.
      • 1
      Kelly Mendonca Hmmm, I'm new to this forum. Not sure where my message went. My new-to-me Monstera developed these patches on two older leaves. The leaf is thinner where the brown is, but not yet crisp. An internet search was inconclusive, but bacteria and root damage came up a lot. I just got this plant on 3/20, watered it once last Sunday when it felt dry. It is far from direct sun (maybe too far, honestly), so it isn't sun damage. Help!
  • Zz plant yellowing
    Hello, I got a new ZZ plant from The SIll and overall it seems to be doing really well. However, I saw these new leaves growing which are yellowing. Should I remove them? If so, recommendations on how to best do so? Thank you!
      • 1
      Pei I would snip it as close to the case as possible!
      • 1
      PlntNrd How much and how often are you watering it? ZZ plants do not need much water and thrive with a bit of neglect when it comes to watering. There’s also a good chance there isn’t a drainage hole in that pot. The Sill adds a drainage layer, but if you’re filling the pot with so much water it’s higher than that layer, it makes the added drainage ineffectual. I have a ZZ plant from The Sill, in a pot with no hole, and I only water it twice a month. That doesn’t mean that you should only water yours twice a month, as every home and situation is different, but I would definitely look at home much and how often you’re currently watering and possibly cut back on both.
  • Damage on snake plant
    I just got a new snake plant recently from The Sill and I can't remember if this was on there when I picked it up for if it developed since then. Any idea what type of damage this is and if I should remove it or let it be?

    Thank you :)
      • 1
      jenna That is a snake fungus and it can be nasty. Cut that stem off and disinfect your cutters with rubbing alcohol. Rubbing alcohol isn’t good for plants, but I would spritz it a little tiny bit with a little bit diluted. If you see more, cut those stems to. It can spread and the plant will almost ‘melt’.
      • 2
      PlntNrd What does it feel like? If it’s firm, not at all mushy, I would leave it and keep an eye on it to see if it’s getting bigger or if it changes. It’s very possible that it’s environmental damage from getting knocked or injured at the store or something like that. I would thoroughly check for bugs, just to make sure. If it’s mushy or soft, then there’s a good chance there’s some kind of internal rotting, probably from overwatering. If that’s the case, you will probably want to remove before it spreads. Be very careful when watering this guy. Snake plants do not need much water at all and if there isn’t a drainage hole in that pot, you need to be even more careful.
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  • Sad Bird's Nest Fern
    Hello,

    I'm having some troubles with my BNF. It looks like the leaves are actually doing quite fine from a color perspective. But from an energy level perspective, they're actually quite sad looking. I did think that I might have watered it too much, because its soil was wet for a few days, so I've extended the timeline of when I water it. For location reference, it's not directly near a window in my office, but it does have line of site to bright office light. I'm wondering if it might be too far though? Though how close to sunlight does it need to be? 

    How can I make my little fern happy again!?
      • 1
      abcactus Hi! I had similar issues with mine, I changed it's the environment and placed it somewhere with more light and gave it more water than I thought it would need. You might want to make sure that it's actually getting enough water to its roots throughout the pot. If the roots do not get enough water, they cannot transport cellulose throughout the leaves and can cause the leaves to sag. Cellulose is what typically keeps the plant looking perky. What is the texture of the leaves? They look a tad crunchy, and if this is so, it might be underwatered. Hope to hear back from you soon!
      • 1
      PlntNrd How much and how often did you water it? I don’t think that pot has a drainage hole, so it’s quite possible you severely overwatered it. These tolerate lower light conditions, but the lower the light, the less water is needed. I have mine in a room that’s fairly dark, no windows, just a skylight and a ceiling fan/lamp and it’s doing fine. You might want to check the soil to see if it’s wet down in the bottom of the pot. If there’s water that’s been sitting in the pot for awhile and the soil has been kept soggy, that will cause the roots to rot. The Sill does add a drainage layer of lava rocks, but if you put so much water that it went above that layer, and then watered again before needed, the drainage layer won’t help. It’s possible that you may need to repot it in fresh dry soil and kind of start over and, if you choose to repot, I would check the roots thoroughly to see if there is any rot issues.
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  • Gynura Aurantiaca (Purple Passion) - To Trim Or Not?
    I have a purple passion that has been growing like crazy and now has 3 pretty solid stalks with big leaves, each around 12"h.

    I'm not sure what my next step with this should be. Sometimes I've seen these grown in hanging planters to cascade a bit, which could be cool. Will these stalks naturally (and safely) just start bending over and growing downward?

    OR should I be pruning it down to make it into more of a bush? Part of me feels like I should be doing this and maybe even trying to root the clippings in the same pot to make the whole thing fuller. In this case, I'm more afraid of doing something that will damage the plant. Not so worried if the clipping don't take root, but it's been growing so well I'd be sad if I hurt the main plant.

    Anyone have experience with any of this?
      • 1
      Pei i think it's a personal preference. I am a sucker for any hanging plants :)
  • Bug on snake plant
    Hello!

    I got a snake plant from The Sill about a month and a half ago and there's a bunch of these little flies in it and around it. Are these harmful and any advice on how to get rid of it?

    Thanks so much!
    Nishi
      • 1
      Pei Defintely fungus gnats. I would recommend to buy diotemacious earth to mix in with the soil at least 3 to 4" deep in the soil. Make sure you don't water it and let the soil dry out. Gnats are not life-threatening to the plants, but they are very annoying and takes time to rid of.

      Alternatively you could also repot the plant immediately - get rid of all the soils and gnats too!

      Make sure to isolate your plants too so the gnats doesn't affect other plants!
      • 1
      PlntNrd Those are definitely fungus gnats. They are also called Soil gnats and they live in any kind of wet soil, moss, etc. They do feed on fungus, but not only on fungus. So you most likely got them by bringing an infested plant in to your home. The larvae feed on roots and can damage your plants. It sucks once you get them, because they can be a huge pain to get rid of. The best thing that I have found is to use something to treat the soil in order to kill the eggs and larvae AND get those sticky traps to kill the adults. Most of the things that kill the eggs/larvae don’t kill the adults and vice versa. So you have to do a two pronged approach. The sticky traps are these yellow sticky tapes on plastic or wood sticks that you can stick directly in the soil. The adults are attracted to the color and will stick to it, keeping them from being able to lay more eggs in your soil. You might just want to go ahead and dump that soil and start over with fresh clean soil, but still treat the new soil and get the sticks. If you dump out the infested soil, you might be able to seriously minimize the infestation. You should wash the pot before putting fresh soil and returning the plant: Also, if you have other plants, they are probably infested now too. A lot of people say that fungus/soil gnats are a product of overwatering and it’s not true. They come from other infested plants. You could not water your plant for months, once you water again, the eggs in the soil hatch and bam, it’s starts all over. The only thing you will kill by not watering, is your plant. Overwatering certainly makes the problem much worse, but it’s not the cause.
      • 1
      Plants_Armstrong Not an expert but those look like fungus gnats. I believe they come about if your soil gets fungus on the top layer. It provides a good place for them to lay their eggs, and the larvae eat it. I don't actually think they are harmful to plants, but they are a nuisance.

      If you look up fungus gnats you will find some ways to get rid of them. The methods range quite a bit. I have them as well and decided not to bother too much since there aren't many and they don't seem to be causing any problems.
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  • Aralia care
    I am a fairly confident plant parent, but definitely struggle with keeping my Aralia happy. Does anyone have any tips to share?

    Specifically, what do you do when it goes in a "shedding mood"? The photo is what it looks like now – it was twice fuller and compacted before :( 
      • 1
      Pei [291063,Plants_Armstrong] here it is!
  • something is eating my basil..
    these dots/patterns have been forming on my basil plant, and after some time it completely dries out the leaves. What is it? What can I do about it? and are the basil leaves still safe to eat?
      • 3
      PlntNrd Are any of the areas sticky at all? It definitely looks like you have some sort of pest. You can see by the mottled leaves that are drooping. Now you just have to determine what exactly it is. The first thing I would do is isolate that basil plant away from all over you other plants to try to keep the infestation from spreading.
  • naturally forming roots around pothos?
    I purchased this huge pothos plant some time ago, and they've come with these brown things that look like roots. I'm now trying to propagate them and took a few cuttings and have them in water, but I wonder if these brown parts are themselves roots and I don't need to sprout new roots before I can plant them? How should this pothos plant be propagated?

    Also, why are these roots forming in plain air?
      • 3
      PlntNrd Those are nodes and they roots will form from those. They aren’t actually roots or aerial roots. If you take a cutting, make sure it has these nodes, along with multiple leaves, the roots will grow out of the nodes the are either in water or soil.
  • Unhappy lavender?
    I bought this lavender pot from Trader Joe's in February. Whatever I do--give water, don't give water--it seems to be unhappy and more and more of the bottom half is drying out. It sits on a window sill facing East but doesn't get an exorbitant amount of light. For example, its neighbors are dracena kiwi, pothos, and prayer plant and they seem to be doing fine.

    Any ideas for what might be happening?
      • 3
      PlntNrd Lavender is very hard to grow indoors and it makes sense that your dracaena, pothos, and prayer plants are all doing fine in the same spot. They can tolerate lower light conditions, while lavender is a full sun plant, which means it really needs direct sunlight for at least 6-8 hrs a day. It also prefers to dry out a bit between waterings, so fully drenching and then allowing to dry before watering again works best. Lavender also grows best in alkaline soil with a ph of around 7
  • Is something eating my fig?
    I’ve had my fiddle a year, almost killed her by misting unnecessarily, resulting in a fungus, and then moving her to a corner not well-lit enough... but the last 9 months have been pretty good. Until recently. I think something is maybe eating her? I don’t see any bugs in the dirt, on the stems, or on the leaves, and none of my other plants seem to be affected. The holes are rather large, so if it is an insect, I assume it either has to be a large infestation or a large insect. We do have brown marmorated stink bugs in my area (Chicago) and I’ve recently been finding some inside trying to stay warm. Could that be it? Is it something else? Also, it appears to be happening to relatively new leaves only. 
      • 2
      PlntNrd I think you’re right about it being the stink bugs or some kind of pest. Low humidity or underwatering causes the leaves to get too dry, which then leads to the leaves developing crispy dry areas, and those can turn in to holes when the necrotic tissue fades away. It doesn’t look like that to me. I think you would see brown patches that haven’t turned in to the holes yet. It doesn’t make sense that all of the brown dry patches would suddenly become holes at the same time. I can’t see the whole leaf in the pics, but the parts that I can see look pretty healthy, other than the holes. It really looks like something is eating the leaves and I really think you might be on to something with the stink bug theory. We have a horrible stink bug problem in Maryland and they are well known around here to, not only, cause significant damage to outdoor ornamental plants, fruit, and veggies, but also houseplants. I would look in to what treatments are available to deal with stink bugs. We have broad spectrum sprays that deal with stink bugs, mealys, scale, etc, so I would get something that kills/deters, not just stink bugs, but other pests too, just in case. Or get a broad spectrum systemic treatment that will kill anything that tries to eat your plants.
      • 1
      Pei [293644,Slogs] can you post a photo of the whole plant? it looks to me more like caused by underwater or a humidity issue.
      • 1
      Slogs Underside of that leaf
      X
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